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It’s All About Hope, Even in the Church (Dec 9, 2018)

Luke 3:1-6

In the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius, when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, and Herod was ruler of Galilee, and his brother Philip ruler of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias ruler of Abilene, 2 during the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John son of Zechariah in the wilderness. 3 He went into all the region around the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, 4 as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah, “The voice of one crying out in the wilderness: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. 5 Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth; 6 and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.’ “

One thing most all of us have in common, I think, is that we all want to make a difference. We all want to believe we are valued and that what we have to contribute to the world around us is worthwhile.

Which is one reason why we seek some sense of power and influence. Because it’s from those positions that we can have an impact. When we have some authority we can more quickly make changes that we believe will improve things. Sometimes that influence is abused and is used for selfish purposes, but often the intention is good. Make a difference, be the change, improve the world. If you’re not recognized as influential, no one will ever know whether or not what you can contribute would be helpful.

We’ve got in this text a whole line-up of power players. Luke lists a virtual “Who’s who” of authorities and big-time players. Emperors, governors, rulers of various regions, and high priests. Political and religious influencers. Everyone who can have an impact on the world around them is listed.

And then comes John the Baptist. This guy who’s living out in the desert, wearing camel’s hair and eating bugs. Pretty significant contrast between the Emperor of the most powerful nation the world had ever known and this “possibly” sane man screaming quotes from old-time prophets out in the wilderness.

And yet, Luke makes clear, when a word of hope is needed in the world, God sent it through wilderness-John, the bug-eater. And I think we would all say that if there’s any hope for the world at all, God would certainly be at the top of the list of providers. And bug-eater John is who and how God brings a word of hope into the world.

One of the things I learned on my “Listening Tour” sabbatical is how lots of people view the church. The church is seen by many (both inside and outside the church) as similar to John the Baptist. Maybe the church used to be influential, but now it’s just kind of quaint. A group of kind of naïve do-gooders who are just a bit out of touch. The church would be a good place, perhaps, to bring your kids so they can learn how to be nice and moral citizens. But not much more. If you are looking for charity, go to the church. But if you’re looking to change the world, you gotta go to the power-players, the influential folks. Go to the people and the institutions that give you the best hope of making a difference. That is not perceived as the church.

And yet, when a word of hope is needed in the world, God has sent it through the church. I think the more the world looks to power for hope, the more important the message of hope from the church becomes. What so many people consider to be the least likely source of life-changing hope becomes an instrument used by God for that very purpose.

Advent is all about hope, and how God reveals it.

Today, Daniel P, from our council’s vision team, will share experiences of God hope revealed in this church.

Next week, Venessa V will share how God’s hope is revealed in our neighborhood.

And two weeks from now, our Bishop, Jim Gonia, will talk about God’s hope being revealed in our world.

Advent is the season of hope. It’s all about hope. And God’s hope is sometimes revealed in the least likely ways through the least likely people. Blessed Advent. May it be filled with renewed hope for you.

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Posted by on December 9, 2018 in Sermon

 

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The Paradox of Advent (Dec 2, 2018)

Luke 21:25-36

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. 26 People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. 27 Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. 28 Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

29 Then he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees; 30 as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. 31 So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. 32 Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. 33 Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.

34 “Be on guard so that your hearts are not weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of this life, and that day does not catch you unexpectedly, 35 like a trap. For it will come upon all who live on the face of the whole earth. 36 Be alert at all times, praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that will take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.”

A friend of mine once told a story of attending a contemplative retreat. One activity involved several minutes of complete darkness. Windows covered with heavy plastic, lights off, etc. Complete and utter darkness without distractions.

As darkness settled, it became unsettling. After several minutes, however, tiny pinpoints of light became visible through the plastic covering the windows—light that would never have been seen if not for the attempt at absolute darkness.

Light is seen while you are in complete darkness. That’s a paradox: two things that seem to be opposite that are present at the same time. Instead of “either/or,” a paradox is “both/and.”

Our faith is actually grounded in paradox. Hope is experienced in the midst of despair. Light experienced in the midst of darkness. Life experienced in the midst of death. That’s the nature of a paradox. There’s a both/and thing.

As we begin Advent, this text from Luke does that same thing. It sounds all miserable and hopeless. Jesus is talking about the end of the world, the end of time.

And in the very midst of all this destruction, Jesus tells us to “stand up, raise our heads, because our redemption is drawing near.”

Redemption in the midst of destruction. We begin the season of Advent with this paradox. In the very midst of those things that cause us anguish and anxiety, hope is present.

The whole point of Advent is that “it’s all about hope.” Christ brings hope among us in wonderful and surprising ways. Always. Sometimes you can only see it in the darkness.

We’re spending these four weeks of Advent revealing the hope that Christ brings. Four different people will share their experiences of visible light of hope in the darkness. This week is “Hope in Our Lives,” and Susan J will share her experience of hope in a dark time.

Next week Daniel P will share his experience of “Hope in Our Church.”

Following that, Venessa V will talk about her experience of “Hope in Our Neighborhood.”

The last week of Advent, our RMS Bishop, Jim Gonia will be here and share his experiences of “Hope in Our World.”

It’s all about hope. Hope has come. Hope is present. Hope can be seen. When all the destruction and despair and the anxiety and the fear “begin to take place, stand up and raise your head, because redemption is drawing near.”

 
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Posted by on December 2, 2018 in Sermon

 

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When all the Familiar Rules No Longer Apply (Nov 4, 2018)

John 11:32-44

(The sermon for this day was not written in any form, therefore cannot be posted here. That “lack of a safety net” was a first for me, and was actually part of the message itself: New life in Christ isn’t necessarily comfortable).

 
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Posted by on November 4, 2018 in Sermon

 

Reforming, Mission, and Model: This Matters (Oct 28, 2018)

John 8:31-36

Then Jesus said to the Jews who had believed in him, “If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples; 32 and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” 33 They answered him, “We are descendants of Abraham and have never been slaves to anyone. What do you mean by saying, “You will be made free’?” 34 Jesus answered them, “Very truly, I tell you, everyone who commits sin is a slave to sin. 35 The slave does not have a permanent place in the household; the son has a place there forever. 36 So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed.

“Churches that love their model more than the mission will die.” [i]

That’s one of the predictions from Carey Nieuwhof, who’s a broadly recognized and acclaimed church futurist. Here’s how he explains that prediction:

When the car was invented, it quick[ly] took over from the horse and buggy. Horse and buggy manufacturers were relegated to boutique status and many went under, but human transportation actually exploded. Suddenly average people could travel at a level they never could before.

The mission is travel. The model is a buggy, or car, or motorcycle, or jet.

Look at the changes in publishing, music, and even photography industry in the last few years.

See a trend? The mission is reading. It’s music. It’s photography. The model always shifts . . . moving from things like 8 tracks, cassettes and CDs to MP3s and now streaming audio and video.

Companies that show innovation around the mission (Apple, Samsung) will always beat companies that remain devoted to the methods (Kodak).

Churches need to stay focused on the mission . . . and be exceptionally innovative in our model.

This is Reformation Sunday. It’s a day where we not only recognize the immense ways the church has reformed its model in its history, but where we open ourselves up to being reformed by God today. The model of how we go about God’s mission is constantly reforming. God’s mission is constant. God’s mission is the recreation of a world where everyone—regardless of anything else—is equally valued, loved, forgiven, respected. The church is created by God exclusively for that mission. The model is up for grabs.

The question for us on this Reformation Sunday is, “To move forward in this mission, how is God trying to reform the church now?” And, “Are we cooperating or resisting?”

We are in the throes of Reformation. Right now. At this moment. Paraphrasing the late Phyllis Tickle, God is having a huge church garage sale. God is even now in the process deciding what will be kept and what will be thrown out. According to what models help God’s mission.

What is God trying to do among us here at LCM? How is God reforming our model of being church? What has to change, perhaps even die, in order for us to more clearly be part of God’s mission in the world?

Let me toss a few things out there and see if anything sticks. I believe God is reforming the church around:

  1. Discipleship—following Jesus—is becoming more important than church order or doctrine. Rather than teaching about the dual nature of Jesus and the Trinity and the books of the Bible in order, it’s becoming more important to accompany people as they struggle to follow in the footsteps of Christ. The Reforming Church will be the living as the Body of Christ present in the world.
  2. Compassion is gaining a voice and growing legs. The church will take the model of God’s unconditional love, mercy, and grace into the streets. We will loudly and visibly take the side of any who are powerless and victimized. If that means we stand up to businesses, elected officials, anyone in power then that’s what we will do it publicly and boldly. One good example right now is how the Reforming Church will respond to the caravan of migrants and refugees coming through Mexico from Central America.
  3. Community matters. Forgiveness and grace lived among us. Everything will begin with how we treat each other in the congregation. Reforming Church communities will be where we practice Jesus’ compassion so that we can carry it out into the world.
  4. Success is being measured by influence rather than numbers. There will be less weight given to worship attendance numbers and more given to how much love and compassion are made real (to real people) in our neighborhoods. The Reforming Church will find ways to measure that success.
  5. Leadership. Luke will lead us. I don’t mean just him. He’s the one who is affirming his baptism today which means he is committing to live as a disciple of Jesus and continue to grow in his capacity to do so. He has a better understanding of what the Reforming Church needs to look like than anyone over 30. The Reforming Church will listen to him.

The church will continue to reform. There will always be a vibrant and mission-focused church led by the Holy Spirit. The question is, which denominations—which congregations will be part of it?

Those congregations where God’s mission matter more than their particular model of being church are being reformed. That, I believe, is good news.

[i] https://careynieuwhof.com/10-predictions-about-the-future-church-and-shifting-attendance-patterns/

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2018 in Sermon

 

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A Place at the Table (Oct 21, 2018)

Mark 10:35-45

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to [Jesus]and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” 36 And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” 37 And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” 38 But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” 39 They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; 40 but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.” 41 When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. 42 So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. 43 But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, 44 and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. 45 For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

Well, whatever’s going on in this text can’t be good. “OK, Jesus, we want you to do whatever we ask.” Promise that first and then we’ll tell you what we want. Deal?

What could possibly go wrong here?

Can you just see Jesus rolling his eyes? Can you hear the deep sigh as he fortifies his patience?

“What is it you want me to do for you?” he asks.

James and John pull him a little further away from the others. Then they lean in close and whisper, “We want to be on either side of you when you become king. We want to ride your coattails into power. We want to sit in the best seats in positions glory. C’mon, Jesus, you know we’re your favorite apostles.”

With a sad look in his eyes, Jesus slowly shakes his head and says “You still don’t get it. Getting more power over others and benefitting yourself is the opposite of how God’s reign works. The ‘way’ of the cross is the way of serving others, giving up power so those without it have equal places at the table.” And then watch when we get to Jerusalem. Watch as I’m arrested, spit at, beaten, mocked, and put on a cross. I’ll show you what this cup is that you want to drink. I’ll show you what this baptism is that you’re so excited about. It’s the opposite of what you think—the opposite of what you want. So be careful. You may just get what you’re asking for. What is greatness?

So I’m wondering before hearing this text, if asked who’s the greatest person you know–would your answer be different than if you were asked now? Isn’t our first, immediate thought someone who is powerful, famous, influential–more along the lines of what James and John are looking for? But then Jesus’ definition sinks in a bit, and we have to rethink it. So go ahead and rethink it. By Jesus’ definition, “whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all,” who is the greatest person you know? . . .

Let me tell you about a great person I met in Jackson, MS this summer. I’d just spend a couple of days in Mississippi, and was finding this state to be both hopeful and frustrating. There were definite signs, not only of the deep and cruel racism that were glaring parts of its history, but also signs of genuine striving for inclusivity and equality. Yet there seemed to be a tiredness, an acceptance by blacks of their lesser places at the table and a refusal by whites to actually acknowledge their seats of privilege. I was confused because MS has the largest percentage of black citizens of any state in the country, and I couldn’t understand why there was such a repressive imbalance of power.

So, on my last night in Jackson, MS, I met a great person. She was a black woman about 25-30 years old and was serving tables at the restaurant of the hotel where I was staying. She was competent, attentive, funny, personable, and was on her way to earning a pretty good tip. We were getting along fine.

On a whim, since it was my last night in MS, I called her over and wondered if she’d answer a question for me. “Sure, if I can,” she said.

I explained to her how I was feeling about this state of Mississippi, and wondered if she had any insights (this was a “listening tour” sabbatical, remember?). “With such a high percentage of black citizens,” I pursued, “why does there seem to be this oppressive undertone? Am I misreading something?”

“No,” she replied. And then she said some things I found incredibly courageous—and that revealed her greatness. “I find it confusing too. I’m not from MS originally—I’ve only lived here for a couple of years. But, yes, for some reason I can’t figure out the power here is still held by whites.”

Then she said what I consider to be the most courageous—and the greatest—thing of all. “For instance, in this hotel, all the service employees are black, and all the managers are white.”

Even though she didn’t know anything about me, who I was, or why I was asking, she spoke up on behalf of blacks who may well be stuck in service jobs relying on tips or minimum wage to pay rent. For all she knew I could’ve been a friend of management coming to check up on how well the service employees were doing their jobs. There were many scenarios where someone like me could have had her fired.

But from her position of relatively little power, she spoke a truth that revealed her greatness. The blindness to power and privilege on the part of management was laid bare by this waitress. A place at the table for all.

The white management of that hotel seeks to sit, one at the right hand and one at the left of glory, clinging to seats of power and refusing to acknowledge any injustice. In the words of Jesus, they lord their power over others and are tyrants over them. And a black table server, drinking the cup that Jesus drinks, the cup of what could have been a huge personal sacrifice, took a risk of becoming last of all by speaking up for service employees who need a place at the table. That’s the greatness Jesus talks about. That’s the greatness James and John don’t understand. That’s the greatness of Jesus himself, and this is the greatness that reveals the nature of God.

It’s the greatness of Jesus that has opened the kingdom of heaven. It is the greatness of Jesus that includes even us. And it’s this greatness of Jesus we are now called to reveal, and then to emulate. “Whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all.” Who opens up places at the table? Who extends the table to include more? Who gives up cushy seats of honor and privilege so that others can share? That person may be the greatest person you know.

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2018 in Sermon

 

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Connected Beyond Me (Oct 14, 2018)

Mark 10:17-31

As [Jesus] was setting out on a journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 18 Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. 19 You know the commandments: “You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; You shall not defraud; Honor your father and mother.’ ” 20 He said to him, “Teacher, I have kept all these since my youth.” 21 Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said, “You lack one thing; go, sell what you own, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” 22 When he heard this, he was shocked and went away grieving, for he had many possessions. 23 Then Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How hard it will be for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!” 24 And the disciples were perplexed at these words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! 25 It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.” 26 They were greatly astounded and said to one another, “Then who can be saved?” 27 Jesus looked at them and said, “For mortals it is impossible, but not for God; for God all things are possible.” 28 Peter began to say to him, “Look, we have left everything and followed you.” 29 Jesus said, “Truly I tell you, there is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or fields, for my sake and for the sake of the good news, 30 who will not receive a hundredfold now in this age—houses, brothers and sisters, mothers and children, and fields, with persecutions—and in the age to come eternal life. 31 But many who are first will be last, and the last will be first.”

This text seems pretty straight-forward. In order to have treasure in heaven, you have to sell everything you own and give all that money to the poor. Then, after you’ve done that, follow Jesus. You have to do that because if you have wealth, it’s impossible to enter the kingdom of God.

Jesus can’t really mean give everything away, can he?

What if he does? What if that’s what it took to be a disciple of Christ? What if Jesus meant this as a requirement to enter the kingdom of God? How would we deal with that?

I’m just going to leave you with that to wrestle with. If you believe this text is a command to give everything you own to the poor, why aren’t you doing it? And if you don’t believe that, why not?

Take that home and wrestle with it, and if that’s all that happens today, it’s a very successful day!

But I want to bring something else into this discussion also. I wonder if Jesus is telling this rich young man that the “one thing” he lacks isn’t the giving away of his possessions. I wonder if what he lacks is an awareness of other people around him. Hear me out on this.

Jesus doesn’t just tell him to get rid of his wealth and his possessions. He specifically tells him to give them to the poor. I wonder if it’s not his wealth that’s the problem, but the insulation his wealth allows him to live in.

Think about that. Our world has certain attitudes about wealth that we all buy in to, to some degree. The danger of wealth is that it lures us into believing we are totally self-sufficient. It gives us a false belief that we don’t need anyone else. The temptation of wealth is that it provides a power that turns us away from others and in on ourselves.

If you’re rich enough, you can afford to live a life separated from people who are different. You can live in a gated community that keeps “those others” out. You don’t have to go places where you encounter anyone who makes you uncomfortable.

Jesus calls out this rich young man to save him from falling prey to the narcissism of wealth that blinds him to others. He exposes this wealthy man’s self-centeredness because it blocks his ability to love others outside of his own small circles. In commanding him to sell everything and give the money to the poor, Jesus is demanding that this young man look beyond his own self and turn towards others—others that he wouldn’t have to encounter if he remained protected by his money.

So Jesus pushes this man away from the insulating protection of his money out towards awareness of the people around him.

That’s what we all want. With or without money, we want that insulated self-reliance. Everyone wants to live without having to rely on anyone else. But the inherent danger of self-reliance is the same one Jesus warns the young man about: self-reliance separates us from real awareness of others.

What matters to Jesus, it seems to me, is that we become aware of others—take them seriously, listen to them, and make their gifts and their needs part of our lives too.

Which is why it’s so painful to hear complaints about worship style. When we are so isolated that we live as if our own personal needs are the only ones that matter, we miss out on the opportunity to support someone else at LCM who experiences worship differently. When we complain about worship, we lack one thing, Jesus says. We lack an awareness of the spiritual needs of the person who might be sitting next to us right now.

An awareness of others. It’s not just money. It’s not just worship style. It’s whatever it is that insulates us from the people around us. It’s whatever it is that make us think someone else’s needs don’t matter. It’s whatever it is that causes us to believe that the other person has nothing to offer us. We lack one thing, Jesus says. An awareness that our own lives aren’t the only ones that matter.

We have an opportunity to step outside of that which insulates us from others and into a deeper awareness of others. Today we turn in our Estimate of Giving cards. We tend to think of these as the church asking us for money—and, well, it is. But it’s so much more than that. Today we can get help with this one thing we lack. This is a tangible way of saying that our own lives aren’t the only ones that matter in God’s kingdom. We are concretely taking the needs of others into account and standing up with them. We do make a financial commitment, but in so doing we are stating clearly that other people matter too because we’re giving money away for the sake of the people around us. We are taking a step to overcome this one thing we lack. And this year we’re offering, all at the same time, several opportunities to commit to others beyond ourselves. Participation in worship isn’t just about what we get out of it, it’s about supporting one another in community with Christ—recognizing that others need you and you need others. Spiritual growth through scripture and prayer, both personally and communally, push us beyond ourselves into a deeper awareness of what God is doing.

Jesus looks at us today, loves us and says, “You lack one thing; go, step outside of yo

 
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Posted by on October 14, 2018 in Sermon

 

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The Church Has Some Serious Work to Do (October 7, 2018)

Mark 8:34-38

He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 35For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. 36For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? 37Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? 38Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”

Let me share with you one of the more surprising things I experienced during my sabbatical. I discovered a hesitancy to tell people what I do for a living. I found myself being just a little bit embarrassed about it.

When I began to hear people’s perspective of the church, what they assume, what they believe, what their personal experiences have been, I found myself not wanting to be associated with the church institution they were describing. Both from people outside of the church and people inside the church.

For instance, Frank in Birmingham, AL, was the grandson of a pastor who served there in the 1960s. I loved the church, he told me. We helped people. We made a difference. I remember the marches, I remember the acts of violence against us. What we did then mattered. We changed people’s lives. But since then, he has found it to be too judgmental for him. People within his own congregation shunned him when he lost his job and eventually his home. He lives in a park and says the church doesn’t matter to him. He’s not bitter or angry about it. He just accepts that as the way things are. Why would he expect anything different from the church? It was as if he was talking about General Motors or Universal Studios or something. Helping him, a homeless black man, isn’t what they’re about.

Or the couple we met during a cooking class in Florence, Italy who were devout and proud members of their church. And the husband who, without even being aware of it, was speaking offensively about race and women. In the same sentences with his church membership. And the rest of the people in the cooking class kind of backed away and tried to change the subject. And so they looked at me and asked, “What do you do, Rob?”

Over and over, time and again, whenever church came up, which, honestly wasn’t that often, I noticed a couple things about it. 1) normally church didn’t much matter—both to members and non-members. It was not a big deal for them. Or, 2) to a few, it mattered greatly. And that was always (hear me!), always in a way that was opposed to my understanding of the gospel. Church was about power (making other people conform to my perspective), about justification (they are less than me unless they do conform). Church was about how they, as church members, could improve their own circumstances. In the language of this gospel text, how they could save their own lives. Church was a way to serve themselves. Every. Single. Time.

There was a universal acceptance of a disconnect between the church and the poor, the vulnerable, the weak, the powerless, the abused, the oppressed, the hopeless. There was no thought that the church exists for the very people Jesus lifts up, holds, comforts, heals, forgives, and hangs out with. The very people Jesus equipped his disciples to go to, to serve, and give themselves away for. In the language of this gospel text, to lose their life for. It was embarrassing that this is the view of the church.

But I needed to hear it. It crystallized some things I’ve been struggling with for a while now. What I was hearing from people about the church was almost completely opposite of the things I was hearing from God about the church. And I’ve got an idea as to how we can move more fully into God’s view of the church. You’ll be hearing more in the days and weeks to come.

The church has some serious work to do, and we need serious disciples to do it. “Those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life?”

The church has some serious work to do, and we need serious disciples to do it. In my estimation, we simply don’t have time to waste. This congregation exists so that each of us can give ourselves away for the benefit of those around us.

Each of us who bears the name of Christ has already been equipped in the waters of that baptismal font to be Christ for the world. To exhibit forgiveness, to live compassion, to serve the poor, to stand with those whose power is taken away, to speak up for those whose voices go unheard. And to speak and live this gospel truth in the very midst of our culture and especially to those with power.

And this is not easy. And this isn’t automatic. And this will require serious discipleship and serious sacrifice. “Those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life?”

The church has some serious work to do, and we need serious disciples to do it. That means we don’t have time to squabble among ourselves over things that don’t matter to the gospel of Christ in the world. We don’t have time to use our own personal preferences to draw a line in the sand. We don’t have time to detour from Christ’s work in our neighborhood to deal with threats because someone isn’t getting their way.

The church has some serious work to do, and we need serious disciples to do it. I hope you’re with me. I hope you too are willing to give up some things in your own life in order to gain life following Jesus. As we increase our service to those Christ calls us to serve, not only do we find real life, but we find real life for this church. The presence of this church can mean something that matters. Something worth giving our time, our money, our very selves away for. “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me.” The church has some serious work to do, and we need serious disciples to do it. It’s worth everything. Let’s get to it.

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2018 in Sermon

 

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