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Abundant Faith: Excelling in Generosity (2 Corinthians 8:7-15)

29 Jun

 

A bunch of boys were playing soccer at recess. They had all the soccer balls off in one corner of the field, but were only playing with one of them. Some girls came up and asked for one of the extra soccer balls. The boys said ‘No, because we might need them.’

Paul keeps telling the congregation in Corinth that God’s grace has provided more than what they need. They have extra everything, he says, because Christ continues to provide them with extra faith, extra speech, extra knowledge, extra eagerness, and extra love. It’s all there, Paul writes. And he reminds them of this over and over.

His question to them here is, Since God has given you more than enough of everything, how about doing something with it? Since you excel in everything by God’s generosity, how about showing that—how about living that?

What does your discipleship look like? Because it has to look like something! If you have been given all kinds of faith and love and forgiveness and generosity to the point of overflowing in you, shouldn’t it be leaking out somewhere!? Shouldn’t it be evident? If you’ve got more soccer balls than you need, shouldn’t the girls be able to play soccer too?

Then Paul advises them on one way their abundant faith can be lived. Remember that collection you were so excited to start a year ago? Remember you were doing that for the poor in Jerusalem? Then you got mad at me and got sidetracked and didn’t finish it? Why not get that collection going again and finish that up? It is a great way to put flesh on this excellent faith you have been given. It’s a way you can live out of the abundance of generosity God has given you. It’s a way to put your beliefs into practice.

Generosity is a very tangible aspect of discipleship. It is a reminder that the ways of God are different than our ways and that our life is found in God’s ways. Generosity is a spiritual thing, so counter-cultural that it seems foolish to many people. It is an expression of life in Christ.

So Paul makes a suggestion–“advice,” he calls it. The excitement you had for helping the poor in Jerusalem a year ago was a faithful response. So finish it up. Let the generous act of our Lord Jesus Christ not only flow into you, but flow out of you too.

Christians have a tendency to emphasize what Jesus gives us, and push aside what that should look like in our lives. Many of us never get to the life-applications of our beliefs. We talk a lot about beliefs, about faith, about discipleship. We have argued and fought over doctrines. We have been very quick to judge as inferior those who believe differently.

But Paul reminds us that talking about discipleship isn’t being a disciple. Debating faith isn’t living faith. Knowing our beliefs isn’t experiencing our beliefs. New life is to be lived in the world! We are called to do what we say we believe!

And one of the most straight-forward, foundational, attention-getting, counter-cultural life practices of Christian discipleship is generosity. Specifically, financial generosity.

Where do you believe God is most active? Where do you believe God’s mercy, compassion, forgiveness, unconditional love are being revealed? If we believe God is doing something in the world, doesn’t it make sense that that belief would be reflected in our lives somehow?

How we use money is one of the loudest statements we can make as to what we really believe. God’s generosity will always provide more grace, forgiveness, and love than we need.

Editing a saying attributed to St. Francis of Assisi, “Preach the Gospel with your generosity, and when absolutely necessary, use words.” May we always grow in faith; and may we always live what we believe. There are plenty of soccer balls for everyone.

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Posted by on June 29, 2015 in Sermon

 

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