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Now is the Time (February 18, 2018)

18 Feb

Mark 1:9-15

In those days Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10 And just as he was coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens torn apart and the Spirit descending like a dove on him. 11 And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.” 12 And the Spirit immediately drove him out into the wilderness. 13 He was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan; and he was with the wild beasts; and the angels waited on him.
14 Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, 15 and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.”

I love the gospel of Mark. The author writes in a fast-paced style, leaving out things that aren’t necessary to his/her main point, with a literary style that ties everything together. The author pulls the reader into the story and continues to make us part of it. We are included as participants all through this gospel.

The first Sunday in Lent is always Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness, but Mark’s gospel cuts to the chase. The temptation is two verses, no fluff, “And the Spirit immediately drove [Jesus] out into the wilderness. He was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan; and he was with the wild beasts; and the angels waited on him.”

That’s it. No description of the temptations. No conversation with the tempter. Not even a mention of whether or not he actually resisted the temptations (though we have to think he probably did). Sparse. Few details. Spirit drove him, 40 days, tempted, wild beasts, angels. That’s it. Then he starts his ministry with another two verses, “Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.’” Again, not a lot of fanfare.

Now, I guess we could compare Mark’s version to Matthew and Luke, then fill in some of Mark’s missing details from there. Because the other gospels include what the specific temptations were—there were three, apparently. They also have Jesus outwitting the devil with his vast knowledge of scripture and divine wisdom. We could spend our time doing that, emphasizing what isn’t in Mark. But then we miss out on what the author of Mark actually does do in this temptation text.

You see, Mark doesn’t care how many temptations there were or how Jesus overcame them. For Mark, the Reign of God begins today. Get on board, because now is the time. God’s reign has come, and nothing will be the same. It’s like an old B Western. “There’s a new sheriff in town. Things are gonna be differ’nt. You better get used to it.”

OK, bad metaphor. But in Mark, Jesus brings this sense of urgency, that time for opposition to God is up, that God’s reign of peace and compassion and justice have truly arrived and will be taking over.

And Mark has this way of inviting us to be part of that narrative. If Jesus is the one in whom all this comes, then now is the time to get on board. The time is fulfilled, Mark writes. The time is now.

So Mark only includes elements of the temptation that make those points. Jesus is driven into the wilderness by the Spirit. The implication and vocabulary implies that Jesus is possessed by the Holy Spirit. This is entirely God’s doing.

Cast out into the wilderness, Jesus confronts Satan, the personification of all things opposed to God. Get used to it, Satan, your 15 minutes of fame are up. And now is the time.

Jesus is with the wild animals, where he’s vulnerable. But nothing happens to him because this is a new day. In the reign of God those who are powerless will be vulnerable no longer. And now is the time.

John is arrested, Mark includes that. John’s ministry was the one that was calling for God’s justice. Now that ministry has been stopped by those threatened by it. Immediately, then, Jesus begins to proclaim that God’s justice has arrived. Those who been able to silence the voice of God’s justice are now done. And now is the time.

The author of Mark proclaims this as real, and present here and now.

And that’s where he/she invites us into the story. The time is fulfilled. These things are happening today. Jesus brings all that God envisions, and we are called to be part of it.

Mark would have us ask, where is Satan today? Think a minute and ask, “What are the forces, the powers, the institutions that are opposed to God today?” Mark invites us to confront them with Jesus, let them know their 15 minutes are up. God’s peace and compassion are going to be lived in this world—right now. By us.

Mark would have us ask, what are the wild beasts today? Think a minute and ask, “Who is preying on the poor, the weak, the vulnerable today?” Mark invites us to stand up to them with Jesus because in the reign of God those who are powerless will be vulnerable no longer.

Mark would have us ask, How is John the Baptist arrested today? Think a minute and ask, “What voices for God’s justice and peace are being silenced today?” Mark invites us to take up that cause and, with Jesus, proclaim God’s justice for all people. Those who silence the voice of God’s justice are now done.

The time is now, Mark writes to us.

I’m well aware that there has already been yet another school shooting in 2018. 17 more children have been killed. The time is now, Mark writes to us.

There is a war on the vulnerable poor right now. A budget proposal for 2019 includes drastic cuts to food stamps, grants for education, healthcare supplements for the poor, housing subsidies for the poor, among others. The time is now, Mark writes to us. “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.”

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Posted by on February 18, 2018 in Sermon

 

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