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In the Midst of Chaos, Jesus Arises (March 4, 2018)

John 2:13-22

The Passover of the Jews was near, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 14 In the temple he found people selling cattle, sheep, and doves, and the money changers seated at their tables. 15 Making a whip of cords, he drove all of them out of the temple, both the sheep and the cattle. He also poured out the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables. 16 He told those who were selling the doves, “Take these things out of here! Stop making my Father’s house a marketplace!” 17 His disciples remembered that it was written, “Zeal for your house will consume me.” 18 The Jews then said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” 19 Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” 20 The Jews then said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?” 21 But he was speaking of the temple of his body. 22 After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.

Wow. Are you able to imagine this scene? Jesus walks into the temple area in Jerusalem—the high, holy place where God resides—and starts running amuck in there. Driving out animals, turning over tables, creating chaos in God’s house. Jesus is disrupting the entire system of the temple.

Since Moses, people of God have been required to offer sacrifices and tithes, according to God’s law. This marketplace in the temple courtyard allowed them to meet the requirements of the law and be found righteous with God. The system worked for everyone. Yet, even though it was beneficial and in keeping with Jewish (and Roman) law, it didn’t fit with God’s kingdom of love and compassion and mercy for all people. This workable, viable, traditional system of sacrifice for righteousness, following rules and procedures in a specific place, needed to end. Since the focus has always been on righteousness with God, sacrifices in the temple don’t actually do that. Righteousness with God is not centered in the temple, but instead is centered in Christ. So Jesus disrupts a system that doesn’t work according to God’s vision in order to lift up a new system that does.

In the midst of the disruption and chaos, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

As long as the temple system was in place and working, God’s vision would never be seen or participated in. There was no easy way to make that adjustment away from it without complete disruption. In the midst of the disruption and chaos, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

There are times when some area of our lives just aren’t working. Times when our lives are in chaos, when things simply feel out of control. The confusion in those times can leave us uncertain and unable to see beyond that chaos. Most of us who’ve experienced chaos in our lives being beyond our control can testify to the reality that God is not always visible at that time. We can’t see beyond the next minute, much less recognize the presence of Christ. In the midst of the disruption and chaos, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

And this is true not just in our individual lives, but in any system or institution or organization that isn’t part of God’s vision of compassion and peace and grace. Not just the temple. Not just the way we run our lives. Bu even Christ’s church itself.

In many parts of the world, especially the US, people are leaving the church in droves. The system—the way of being church that many of us have known all our lives—feels beyond our ability to make work. Our best efforts don’t seem to make much difference at all. Our message of Christ’s love isn’t being heard or believed. No matter what we do, the church doesn’t seem to be able to adapt.

Much like the temple system in Jesus’ day, the church is being disrupted. I wonder if it’s because we are no longer able to see beyond the church system that’s been in place for 1700 years. In the midst of the disruption and chaos, even in the church, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

Here’s how the church system as we know it has developed.[i]

“Jesus’ apostles were constantly getting in trouble with the religious leaders and power brokers of their. . . . They were beaten, jailed, and finally killed because this way of life was such a threat to the social and political order.

“At the beginning of the fourth century . . . the Roman Empire was feeling increasingly threatened by rising forces beyond its border. In CE 311 the Romans became more open minded about matters of religion. Novel (and desperate) idea: pray to any God if it can help us hold back the barbarians! Christians were granted an indulgence and asked to pray “to their God for our safety, for that of the republic, and for their own, that the commonwealth may continue uninjured on every side, and that they may be able to live securely in their homes.” This was the first step in creating an alliance with the Christian God, whom Constantine considered the strongest deity. Two years later, in CE 313, Constantine issued the Edict of Milan decriminalizing Christian worship. At that time he was more concerned about social stability and the protection of the empire from the wrath of the Christian God than he was for justice or care for the Christians. Finally the emperor consolidated his power within the church when he convened the first worldwide gathering of Christian leaders at the Council of Nicaea in CE 325. Christendom was born. The Jesus movement was subsumed into the empire and “Christian disciple” became synonymous with “good citizen.”

“Most churches today mirror political institutions in structure, operation, and governance. Denominations gather to vote on doctrine and polity and, in some cases, to elect bishops to oversee the church. Likewise, pastors are trained and carefully credentialed to administer the sacraments and manage their churches. . . . “Don’t rock the boat” is the underlying narrative. . . . In most Christian quarters, subversion is the enemy.

“The era of the Christian society has now ended in the United States. . . . Citizenship no longer means Christian. The church is no longer the center of life. Organized religion, in its Christendom edition, is growing more and more irrelevant and we are at a loss as to what to do about it.

“What would it look like for the church to reclaim Christ’s subversive gospel of abundance and trust that the kingdom of God is at hand? . . . Oftentimes that creation looks like rebellion to the church authorities— or just plain weird.

“Jesus ultimately died a humiliating and torturous death on the cross because he posed a threat to the political and religious powers.

“The Jesus movement, born out of subversion, is at its best when it is subversive.”

In the midst of the disruption and chaos, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

The major disruption of the temple that felt like the end for Jews in Jerusalem was actually a focus on Jesus as God’s vision for the world. And what feels like the end of the church to many today is the same thing. We are experiencing God at work, a seismic shift away from a church system that works for many, but may not be pointing the world to God’s vision of peace, compassion, and grace for all people. Jesus is stepping in and turning over our tables in order to disrupt the church as we know it. Though we don’t understand and though it’s frighteningly uncomfortable, In the midst of the disruption and chaos, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

Instead of bemoaning the loss of the temple, let us watch for Jesus to arise. And then, let us run to him and embrace him wherever he is and whatever he’s doing. Let us watch for Jesus to arise, for he is the revealing of God’s vision for peace, for compassion, and for grace for the whole world. In the midst of the disruption and chaos, Jesus is lifted up so God’s vision for the world can be seen.

[i] Era of Christendom source: Estock, Beth Ann; Nixon, Paul. Weird Church: Welcome to the Twenty-First Century, The Pilgrim Press. Kindle Edition. 2016.

 

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Posted by on March 6, 2018 in Sermon

 

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“Get Used to the Disruption” (January 28, 2018)

Mark 1:21-28

They went to Capernaum; and when the sabbath came, he entered the synagogue and taught. 22 They were astounded at his teaching, for he taught them as one having authority, and not as the scribes. 23 Just then there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit, 24 and he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are, the Holy One of God.” 25 But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” 26 And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying with a loud voice, came out of him. 27 They were all amazed, and they kept on asking one another, “What is this? A new teaching—with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” 28 At once his fame began to spread throughout the surrounding region of Galilee.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve found myself reading this rather dramatic text pretty casually. Jesus teaches in the synagogue, everyone’s amazed, then he casts out a demon during worship, and he becomes famous. Like all this is no big deal.

But imagine that happening here, today. Say we have a guest preacher who knocks your socks off. Everyone here says, “Wow! This is amazing! She preaches like nothing we’ve ever heard before, not like Pastor Rob! This is astounding!

OK, so far? Now one of you, who is part of this congregation, shouts at her during worship. “Are you here to destroy us? I know who you are!” Then our guest preacher, still in the middle of worship, shouts back, “Be quiet! Come out of him!” Then the one of you who started this whole thing has a seizure and starts screaming.

Do you think things would just continue as normal in that synagogue after that? You can’t ignore those events. The normal, peaceful, status quo of that synagogue has been disrupted—probably forever!

This is pretty dramatic stuff. But in Mark, it’s just the beginning. This is only halfway through the first chapter! Jesus is just getting started here.

But just getting started with what?

Here’s the first chapter of Mark in a nutshell: Jesus is baptized, goes into the wilderness, calls four disciples, –this text: preaches one sermon and casts out a demon, then –next week: heals Simon’s mother-in-law and a bunch of other people, then heals a leper.

These aren’t just random healings. These begin a systematic pattern of disruption in all these communities. And each event is followed by a hint at the disruption that follows. Come back for the next few weeks and follow this—how Jesus comes and disrupts everything. Everything.

And this is just chapter one.

I’m thinking that even though it may start slowly, when Jesus shows up things are disrupted. The status quo cannot survive with Jesus. Things get turned upside down. One sermon and one demon. And an entire synagogue is turned upside down. Jesus is just ramping up.

Remember last week how Jesus began his ministry? Right before he called Simon, Andrew, James, and John to fish for people? He said one sentence, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.” That’s what Jesus is doing: bringing the kingdom of God into our world. And the kingdom of God disrupts everything. It turns everything upside down. Not for its own sake, but because the reign of God is so different than what we’re used to. God operates much differently than us.

Think again about what happened in this text today happened here. A member of the congregation is demon-possessed and this new guest preacher causes a ruckus casting the demon out. For Jesus, that is the new normal for worship. No longer a peaceful, quiet liturgy where everything is nicely projected on screens because that’s how they planned it several weeks ago. Nope. Now it’s more about casting out demons and shouting.

How would you react? Some of us may be upset by the unruly behavior. Others of us might respond by looking around and wondering who else is demon-possessed. We might become frightened to show up because we might be sitting next to someone who doesn’t match our description of a church-goer. Church is supposed to be quiet and peaceful, a sanctuary from the chaos of the world.

But others might invite our demon-possessed friends because Jesus has turned this is into a place of healing and wholeness. Then we become a congregation filled with spiritually unhealthy people who happen to be seeking something better, something new, something life-giving.

How awful, right?

I heard a story of church disrupted by Jesus, told by Prof. Nate Frambach of Wartburg Seminary at a conference retreat this week. I share it because it’s a good example of the kind of disruption Jesus brings.

Nate visited a Lutheran church called “Solomon’s Porch” in Minneapolis. During worship a man got up and shared his story. “I’m a meth addict,” he began. Then he told how one day, strung out, he wandered into Solomon’s Porch because there was a light on and he could smell coffee. There was food and he began stuffing his mouth and his pockets intending to make a quick getaway before anyone knew he was stealing food.

Suddenly, a man appeared next to him. Oh, no, he thought. I’m caught. Yet the man offered his hand and told him to help himself to more food and coffee. “Anything else you need” he asked? “There’s more.” Then he let him know he was welcome to stay for worship if he wanted. He didn’t.

Week after week this happened.

One day, the addict, when asked again by the man if there was anything else he could get for him, ‘fessed up that he was there just taking advantage of them. He was a meth addict and was only coming for free food and coffee.

I know, the other man said. I knew you were strung out the first time I laid eyes on you.

How? The addict asked.

How do you think I found this place? I was you a year ago. I would come in here strung out and someone offered me food and coffee. I was overwhelmed by the compassion, and eventually I stayed.

Sounds to me like Jesus showed up there and disrupted their church a while ago, don’t you think? That’s what Jesus does. Today, he’s disrupting the church. Tomorrow there’s more. And he’s just getting started. I think we better get used to the disruption. The kingdom of God has come near.

 
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Posted by on January 28, 2018 in Sermon

 

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